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What to eat when

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Nutrient timing is a planned alteration of macronutrient intake in order to promote health, workout performance, and get/stay lean.

Nutrient timing strategies are based on how the body handles different types of food at different times. One of the most important nutrient timing principles is that it’s best to eat most non-fruit and veggie carbohydrates during and after exercise.

Many factors influence energy balance, with the laws of thermodynamics being the most important determinants of weight gain and weight loss. Yes, this means how much we eat is priority #1 when changing body composition.

But the key here is “body composition.” If we’re losing equal amounts of fat and muscle when losing weight or gaining equal amounts of fat and muscle when gaining weight, we’re not taking advantage of nutrient timing.

Nutrient timing has several important goals and tis important to eat with caution during various stages as shown :

  • Nutrient partitioning (where the nutrients go when you ingest them).
  • Improved health.
  • Improved body composition.
  • Improved athletic performance.
  • Enhanced workout recovery.
  • When you’re stressed or anxious.
  • When you’re tired or angry.
  • When you’re pregnant or nursing.
  • When you’re at a party.
  • When you’re exercising.
  • When you have a family history of heart disease.
  • When you have digestive distress.
  • When you have a family history of cancer.

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If you’re eating a mix of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins, then you’re probably pretty far ahead of the nutrition curve. But even if you’re hitting your five-a-day, steering clear of the junk food aisle, and are at a healthy weight, there’s still a chance you’re making mistakes with your food choices without even realizing it. Not all foods are created equal—even the healthy ones—and you might not be getting as many vitamins and nutrients as you believe. In fact, you may inadvertently be loading your body with excess sugar and sodium.

Despite what you may have heard, eating breakfast isn’t necessary for everyone. In fact, skipping breakfast may be better than eating unhealthy breakfast foods. However, a nutritious, well-balanced breakfast can give you energy and prevent you from eating too much during the rest of the day.

Not all calories are created equal. Different foods go through different metabolic pathways in your body. They can have vastly different effects on your hunger, hormones and the number of calories you burn.

Here are the Best foods you can eat in the morning –

Eggs – are undeniably healthy and delicious. Studies have shown that eating eggs at breakfast increases feelings of fullness, reduces calorie intake at the next meal and helps maintain steady blood sugar and insulin levels.

In one study, men who ate eggs for breakfast felt more satisfied and took in fewer calories during the rest of the day than those who consumed a bagel.

Additionally, egg yolks contain lutein and zeaxanthin. These antioxidants help prevent eye disorders like cataracts and macular degeneration. Eggs are also one of the best sources of choline, a very important nutrient for brain and liver health. Though high in cholesterol, eggs don’t raise cholesterol levels in most people.

In fact, eating whole eggs may reduce heart disease risk by modifying the shape of “bad” LDL cholesterol, increasing “good” HDL cholesterol and improving insulin sensitivity. What’s more, three large eggs provide about 20 grams of high-quality. Eggs are also very versatile. For example, hard-boiled eggs make a great portable breakfast that can be prepared ahead of time.

Greek Yogurt – Greek yogurt is creamy, delicious and nourishing. It’s made by straining whey and other liquid from milk curds, which produces a creamier yogurt that is more concentrated in protein. Protein has been shown to reduce feelings of hunger and has a higher thermic effect than fat or carbs.

The term “thermic effect” refers to the increase in metabolic rate that occurs after eating. Yogurt and other dairy products can also help with weight control because they increase levels of hormones that promote fullness, including PYY and GLP-1.

What’s more, full-fat yogurt contains conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which may increase fat loss and decrease breast cancer risk. Certain types of Greek yogurt are good sources of probiotics like Bifidobacteria, which help your gut stay healthy.

To make sure your yogurt contains probiotics, look for the phrase “contains live and active cultures” on the label.Try topping Greek yogurt with berries or chopped fruit to increase your meal’s vitamin, mineral and fiber content.

Coffee – is an amazing beverage to start your day. It’s high in caffeine, which has been shown to improve mood, alertness and mental performance. Even small amounts of caffeine can achieve these effects.

An analysis of 41 studies found the most effective dose to be 38–400 mg per day to maximize the benefits of caffeine while reducing side effects. This is roughly 0.3 to 4 cups of coffee per day, depending on the coffee’s strength. Caffeine has also been shown to increase metabolic rate and fat burning. In one study, 100 mg of caffeine per day helped people burn an extra 79–150 calories over a 24-hour period.

In addition, coffee is rich in antioxidants, which reduce inflammation, protect the cells lining your blood vessels and decrease diabetes and liver disease risk.

Oatmeal –  is the best breakfast choice for cereal lovers. It’s made from ground oats, which contain a unique fiber called oat beta-glucan. This fiber has many impressive health benefits, including reduced cholesterol.

What’s more, oat beta-glucan is a viscous fiber that promotes feelings of fullness. One study found that it increased levels of the fullness hormone PYY and that higher doses had the greatest effect. Oats are also rich in antioxidants, which protect their fatty acids from becoming rancid. These antioxidants may also benefit heart health and decrease blood pressure.

Bear in mind that one cup (235 grams) of cooked oatmeal contains only about 6 grams of protein, which won’t provide the benefits of a higher-protein breakfast. To boost the protein content of an oatmeal breakfast, prepare it with milk instead of water or serve it with a side of eggs or a piece of cheese.

Chia seeds – are extremely nutritious and one of the best sources of fiber around. In fact, one ounce (28 grams) of chia seeds provides an impressive 11 grams of fiber per serving. What’s more, a portion of the fiber in chia seeds is viscous fiber, which absorbs water, increasing the volume of food moving through your digestive tract and helping you feel full and satisfied.

In a small, 12-week study, people with diabetes who ate chia seeds experienced reduced hunger, along with improvements in blood sugar and blood pressure. Chia seeds are also high in antioxidants, which protect your cells from unstable molecules called free radicals that are produced during metabolism. In another study of people with diabetes, chia seeds decreased the inflammatory marker CRP by 40%. Elevated CRP is a major risk factor for heart disease.

However, one serving of chia seeds provides only about 4 grams of protein, which may not be optimal for breakfast.

Berries – are delicious and packed with antioxidants. Popular types include blueberries, raspberries, strawberries and blackberries. They’re lower in sugar than most fruits, yet higher in fiber.

In fact, raspberries and blackberries each provide an impressive 8 grams of fiber per cup or 120 and 145 grams, respectively. What’s more, one cup of berries contains only 50–85 calories depending on the type. Berries also pack antioxidants called anthocyanins, which protect your heart and may help you age better.

Berries have been shown to reduce markers of inflammation, prevent blood cholesterol from oxidizing and keep the cells lining your blood vessels healthy. A good way to add berries to your breakfast is to eat them with Greek yogurt or cottage cheese.

Nuts – are tasty, satisfying and nutritious. They’re a great addition to your breakfast, as they’re filling and help prevent weight gain. Even though nuts are high in calories, studies suggest you don’t absorb all the fat in them.

In fact, your body only absorbs about 129 calories of a 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of almonds. This may be true for some other nuts as well, though at this time only almonds have been tested.

Furthermore, nuts have been shown to improve heart disease risk factors, reduce insulin resistance and decrease inflammation.  All types of nuts are also high in magnesium, potassium and heart-healthy mono-unsaturated fat.

What’s more, Brazil nuts are one of the best sources of selenium — just two Brazil nuts provide more than 100% of the recommended daily intake. Nuts are also beneficial for people with diabetes. In one study, replacing a portion of carbs with 2 ounces (56 grams) of nuts led to reduced blood sugar and cholesterol levels. Topping Greek yogurt, cottage cheese or oatmeal with 2 tablespoons of chopped nuts provides crunch and flavor while increasing your breakfast’s nutritional value.

Green Tea – is one of the healthiest beverages on the planet. It contains caffeine, which improves alertness and mood, along with raising metabolic rate. Green tea provides only 35–70 mg of caffeine per cup, which is about half the amount in coffee.

Green tea may be especially helpful against diabetes. A review of 17 studies found that green tea drinkers had reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. It also contains an antioxidant known as EGCG, which may protect your brain, nervous system and heart from damage

Protein Shake – Another great way to start your day is with a protein shake or smoothie. Several types of protein powder can be used, including whey, egg, soy and pea protein. However, whey protein is absorbed most quickly by your body.

Whey has also been studied the most and provides several health benefits. Additionally, it seems to reduce appetite more than other forms of protein. One study comparing four high-protein meals found that the whey protein meal reduced appetite the most and led to the lowest calorie intake at the next meal.

In addition, whey protein can help lower blood sugar levels when consumed as part of a carb-containing meal. It can also preserve muscle mass during weight loss and aging. Regardless of the type of protein powder used, a high-protein shake can be satisfying and filling. Add fruits, greens, nut butter or seeds to provide fiber and antioxidants.

Fruits – can be a delicious part of a nourishing breakfast. All types of fruit contain vitamins, potassium, fiber and are relatively low in calories. One cup of chopped fruit provides about 80–130 calories, depending on the type. Citrus fruits are also very high in vitamin C.

In fact, one large orange provides more than 100% of the recommended daily intake for vitamin C. Fruit is also very filling due to its high fiber and water contents. Pair fruit with eggs, cheese, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt for a well-balanced breakfast that will sustain you for hours.

Flax Seeds – are incredibly healthy. They’re rich in viscous fiber, which helps you feel full for several hours after eating.

Flaxseeds may also improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood sugar levels, as well as protect against breast cancer.Two tablespoons (14 grams) of ground flaxseeds contain 3 grams of protein and 4 grams of fiber.

Try adding flaxseeds to Greek yogurt, cottage cheese or a smoothie to increase the fiber and antioxidant content of your breakfast. Just make sure to choose ground flaxseeds or grind them yourself, because whole flaxseeds can’t be absorbed by your gut and will simply pass through your system.

Cottage Cheese – is a fantastic breakfast food. It’s high in protein, which increases metabolism, produces feelings of fullness and decreases levels of the hunger hormone. In fact, cottage cheese has been shown to be as filling and satisfying as eggs.

Full-fat cottage cheese also contains conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which may promote weight loss.One cup of cottage cheese provides an impressive 25 grams of protein. Add berries and ground flaxseeds or chopped nuts to make it even more nutritious.

 

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Leafy greens – include kale, spinach, collards, swiss chards and a few others. They have several properties that make them perfect for a weight loss diet, such as being low in calories and carbohydrates and loaded with fiber.

Eating leafy greens is a great way to increase the volume of your meals, without increasing the calories. Numerous studies show that meals and diets with a low energy density make people eat fewer calories overall.

Leafy greens are also incredibly nutritious and very high in many vitamins, antioxidants and minerals, including calcium, which has been shown to aid fat burning in some studies

Cruciferous Vegetables – vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts. Like other vegetables, they’re high in fiber and tend to be incredibly filling. What’s more, these types of veggies generally contain decent amounts of protein.

They’re not nearly as high in protein as animal foods or legumes but still high compared to most vegetables. A combination of protein, fiber and low energy density makes cruciferous vegetables the perfect foods to include in your meals if you need to lose weight. They’re also highly nutritious and contain cancer-fighting substances.

Boiled potatoes – White potatoes have several properties that make them a perfect food — both for weight loss and optimal health. They contain an incredibly diverse range of nutrients — a little bit of almost everything you need.

There have even been accounts of people living on nothing but potatoes alone for extended periods of time. They’re particularly high in potassium, a nutrient that most people don’t get enough of and that plays an important role in blood pressure control. On a scale called the Satiety Index, which measures how filling different foods are, white, boiled potatoes scored the highest of all the foods tested.

What this means is that by eating white, boiled potatoes, you will naturally feel full and eat less of other foods. If you allow potatoes to cool for a while after boiling, they will form high amounts of resistant starch, a fiber-like substance that has been shown to have various health benefits, including weight loss. Sweet potatoes, turnips and other root vegetables are also excellent.

Beans and legumes – Some beans and other legumes can be beneficial for weight loss. This includes lentils, black beans, kidney beans and some others. These foods tend to be high in protein and fiber, which are two nutrients that have been shown to lead to satiety.

They also tend to contain some resistant starch. The main problem is that a lot of people have difficulties tolerating legumes. For this reason, it’s important to prepare them properly.

Soups – As mentioned above, meals and diets with a low energy density tend to make people eat fewer calories. Most foods with a low energy density are those that contain lots of water, such as vegetables and fruits.

But you can also just add water to your food, making a soup. Some studies have shown that eating the exact same food turned into a soup rather than as solid food, makes people feel more satiated and eat significantly fewer calories. Just make sure not to add too much fat to your soup, such as cream or coconut milk, as this can significantly increase its calorie content.

Cottage Cheese – Diary products tend to be high in protein. One of the best ones is cottage cheese, which — calorie for calorie — is mostly protein with very few carbs and little fat. Eating cottage cheese is a great way to boost your protein intake.

It’s also very satiating, making you feel full with a relatively low number of calories. Dairy products are also high in calcium, which may aid fat burning. Other low-fat, high-protein dairy products include Greek yogurt and skyr.

Avocados – are a unique fruit. While most fruits are high in carbs, avocados are loaded with healthy fats. They’re particularly high in monounsaturated oleic acid, the same type of fat found in olive oil. Despite being mostly fat, avocados also contain a lot of water and fiber, making them less energy-dense than you may think.

What’s more, they’re a perfect addition to vegetable salads, as studies show that their fat content can increase carotenoid antioxidant absorption from the vegetables 2.6- to 15-fold. They also contain many important nutrients, including fiber and potassium.

Apple Cider Vinegar – is incredibly popular in the natural health community. It’s often used in condiments like dressings or vinaigrettes, and some people even dilute it in water and drink it. Several human-based studies suggest that apple cider vinegar can be useful for weight loss.

Taking vinegar at the same time as a high-carb meal can increase feelings of fullness and make people eat 200–275 fewer calories for the rest of the day. One 12-week study in obese individuals also showed that 15 or 30 ml of vinegar per day caused weight loss of 2.6–3.7 pounds, or 1.2–1.7 kilograms.

Vinegar has also been shown to reduce blood sugar spikes after meals, which may have various beneficial health effects in the long term

Whole grains – Though cereal grains have received a bad reputation in recent years, some types are definitely healthy. This includes some whole grains that are loaded with fiber and contain a decent amount of protein.

Notable examples include oats, brown rice and quinoa. Both brown and white rice can contain significant amounts of resistant starch, particularly if cooked and then allowed to cool afterward.

Keep in mind that refined grains are not a healthy choice, and sometimes foods that have “whole grains” on the label are highly processed junk foods that are both harmful and fattening.

If you’re on a very low-carb diet, you’ll want to avoid grains, as they’re high in carbs. But there’s otherwise nothing wrong with eating whole grains if you can tolerate them.

Chilli Pepper – Eating chili peppers may be useful on a weight loss diet. They contain capsaicin, a substance which has been shown to reduce appetite and increase fat burning in some studies. This substance is even sold in supplement form and a common ingredient in many commercial weight loss supplements.

One study showed that eating 1 gram of red chili pepper reduced appetite and increased fat burning in people who didn’t regularly eat peppers. However, there was no effect in people who were accustomed to eating spicy food, indicating that a certain level of tolerance can build up.

Coconut oil – Not all fats are created equal. Coconut oil is high in fatty acids of a medium length, called medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs). These fatty acids have been shown to boost satiety better than other fats and increase the number of calories burned.

What’s more, two studies — one in women and the other in men — showed that coconut oil reduced amounts of belly fat. Of course, coconut oil still contains calories, so adding it on top of what you’re already eating is a bad idea.

It’s not about adding coconut oil to your diet but about replacing some of your other cooking fats with coconut oil. However, studies show that coconut oil is less satiating than MCT oil — a supplement that contains much higher numbers of medium-chain triglycerides.

Extra virgin olive oil is worth mentioning here, as it’s probably one of the healthiest fats on the planet. For top disease-fighting power, eat all of these amazing edibles together with other healthful foods that didn’t make top 10 list, including green tea, chocolate, alcohol (in limited quantities), olive oil, and soy.

Beyond the choices listed here, fruits and vegetables in general are powerhouses of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. By eating five or more servings a day, you help protect your body from heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. The real key to preventing disease and promoting health is not certain foods, but a lifestyle of regular physical activity and healthy eating, experts say.

Overall, an eating plan low in saturated fat and rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes is your best bet for a healthy heart. And there is very little evidence that individual foods with super-nutrient profiles can reduce the risk of cancer. But healthy dietary patterns, including these foods, along with a healthy lifestyle, [are] critical to reducing risk for cancer.

Remember that portion size does matter, even when it comes to healthful foods. If you gain weight eating super-portions of super-nutritious foods, you’ll negate the health benefits because of the health risks associated with being overweight. Also keep in mind that taking a vitamin, mineral, or herbal supplement is no replacement for eating a variety of healthy food. There is limited evidence that supplements, beyond filling nutritional gaps.

Make no mistake about it; eating healthfully — at least most of the time — is your best defense against chronic diseases. And the best part? Good nutrition really does taste great.

 

Click here for Are you a breakfast fanatic, an early luncher or a late-night snacker?

The answer to that question may have greater implications for health than one might think. Although what we put in our bodies matters most, when we choose to eat that food also has an impact on how our bodies will process it and our likelihood of gaining weight from it.

The timing of when we eat can influence body weight.The most important aspect of any diet is keeping overall calorie consumption in check, particularly for those with diabetes or who are trying to lose weight. But the schedule people follow in eating meals and snacks can help them either stay on track with their diets, or be more easily swayed off course.

Following are eating-schedule habits, they might help or hurt.

Eating a big breakfast – An old adage advised people to “eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a queen and dinner like a pauper.” This may be the best way plan daily meals.
Eating a big meal in the morning gives the body plenty of energy to start the day, and sets the pace of metabolism for the rest of the day. It helps people avoid feeling so hungry at subsequent meals that it derails their diets.

But just be careful to eat a big breakfast that is filled with healthy foods, such as one serving of lean protein, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Don’t load up on too many carbohydrates first thing in the morning, though, because it could lead to sluggishness later in the day.

Skipping breakfast – It’s normal for people to have different preferences about when they eat, and some people say they just don’t like to eat breakfast. But regardless of how opposed the body seems to eating in the morning, breakfast really is most important meal of the day.

Because these personal preferences are also mostly shaped by habit, they can be changed by building new habits. Start out by eating a single piece of fruit or toast to get the body comfortable digesting something early in the morning.

Breakfast should ideally be eaten within an hour of getting up, and a big meal is not needed to jump-start the body’s metabolism. People who skip breakfast are a third more likely to be obese.

A long, large lunch – The traditional European lifestyle, in which people take a long lunch break to consume the day’s main meal, might partly explain why Europe’s obesity levels are lower than those of the U.S.

Eating a large lunch is better for the body than eating a big dinner, because it means that calories consumed throughout the day are more evenly distributed, and satiety is also more even throughout the day.

But be careful about eating too much at any meal, because that can lead to weight gain even if you reduce calories consumed at other meals. The body is only going to use what it needs at one particular meal, and the rest of it is going to be stored in the body as fat.

Snack-size meals throughout the day – Another often-used dieting trick is to eat small snacks throughout the day, in lieu of larger meals. This is supposed to keep portion sizes in check, while maintaining fullness throughout the day.

This strategy can work well for some people, as long as they stay within their bounds for target calorie consumption. Some dietitians even advocate that the small, constant meals rev up metabolism and encourage weight loss. However, the main problem is that “people don’t know what ‘small’ means,” and so they tend to overshoot their calorie limits, and wind up eating more than they should.

A big dinner – In American culture, people often eat their biggest meal of the day at dinnertime. While people may like the idea of friends or family members gathering to discuss the day’s events and share a feast, unfortunately, that’s not what’s best for health.

People who reserve their biggest meal for the end of the day may tend to eat less before that point. If you go into dinner ravenous, the tendency is to over-eat.

A better option for people who want to keep their dinnertime tradition is to reduce portion sizes. This can accomplish the goals of both getting in some bonding time, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. People can redistribute those extra dinner calories to breakfast and lunch, to maintain a steadier level of fullness throughout the day.

Three meals with three snacks in between – This eating schedule is the golden ticket for health, though as always, it’s critical that the total calories and fat consumed are kept at or under individual daily goals.

Most important is the minimum of three meals daily, which keeps you feeling full the longest, adding that how you divide up your calories depends on your individual schedule. If the body goes more than four or five hours without eating, this will effect metabolism and how likely overindulgence is at the next meal.

The plan of three main meals with snacks in between is good because this plan takes people’s busy schedules into account. When it’s not possible to sit down for lunch until 3 p.m., having a light snack available can stave off hunger. This schedule keeps you in more control of the food choices you make,

Stop eating at certain time – Some diet plans tempt participants with an offer that they can eat whatever they want, they just can’t eat after a certain time of day, usually in the late afternoon or early evening. The assumption is that this plan will lower overall calorie consumption, but in all likelihood, people will compensate by eating more calories earlier in the day.

Diets that rely on gimmicks to help people lose weight often don’t present a long-term solution to calorie consumption,

Late night eating – A big problem with eating late at night is that it doesn’t allow for the body to be active and burn most of the calories consumed within hours of a meal. Going to bed soon after eating means that more calories will be converted to fat. Staying up for at least two or three hours after a meal, and one hour after a snack.

Additionally, staying up should mean maintaining some level of activity, not zoning out in front of the TV. Sitting in the “recliner is the same as going into the bed.” The recliner is where a lot of people tend to get into trouble, as there is a tendency to relax at the end of the day, and to indulge in snack foods.

For the average person coming into my office with weight problems, the biggest problem is after-dinner snacking. People who stay up very late, a snack at midnight is a fine choice, as long as it fits into the overall calorie plan, and the consumer is planning on staying up for long enough to digest it.

Fasting Diets – Any diet that involves fasting for an extended time is not likely to be very effective. While it can lead to weight loss in the short-run, as soon as the dieter starts eating normally again, he or she will most likely regain all of the weight that was lost. One reason for this is that the weight lost comes from losing fluids, not fat. Fasting is not a means of controlling one’s weight.

Even more problematic is the tendency for people to be disheartened when the weight is regained, and simply give up on dieting all together. Pass it on: In order to best control your weight, eat three meals daily, and be prepared with three snacks.

 

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Cold : During cold eat Carrot, Pineapple, Ginger, Garlic.

Headache : Eat Apple, Cucumber, Kale, Ginger, Celery if you have headache.

Ulcer : Cabbage, Carrot, and Celery if you have Ulcer.

High B.P.: Beet, Apple, Celery, Cucumber and Ginger are good for High B.P.

Kidney Detox : Carrot, Watermelon, Cucumber, Cilantro will help in case of Kidney Detox.

Eyes : To improve eyesight eat more of Carrot and Celery

Constipation : If You are suffering from constipation eat fresh Cabbage, Apple and Carrot.

Hangover : Eat Apple Carrot Beet and lemon to reduce hangover.

Nervousness : In order to overcome nervousness eat Pomegranate, Carrot and Celery.

Indigestion: Eat Pineapple, Mint, Carrot and Lemon.

Memory Loss : Pomegranate, Beets and grapes will improve your memory.

Fatigue : Eat Spinach, Carrot, Green Apple, Beets and Lemon to overcome fatigue.

Stress : Banana, Strawberry and Pear will residue your stress.

Kidney Stone : Eat more of Orange, Apple, Watermelon and lemon.

Arthritis : Carrot, Celery, Pineapple and Lemon will control Arthritis

Asthma : Eat Carrot, Spinach, Apple, Garlic and Lemon.

Diabetes : Spinach, Carrot and Celery will control diabetes

Depression : Carrot, Apple, Spinach and beet will reduce your depression and eliminate in some cases.

Food to Fight Cardiovascular disease – Eating a wide variety of fruit and vegetables can help reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Fruit and vegetables contain vitamins and phytochemicals that help prevent the oxidation of cholesterol, which reduces the chance of it being deposited in the arteries. They also contain carbohydrates which give the body energy, but are low in fat which can help with weight control.

Beans, pulses and porridge oats are high in soluble fibre, which encourages the body to excrete cholesterol before it can be reabsorbed into the bloodstream. Nuts help increase levels of HDL cholesterol. Soya is a food source of protein, fibre and unsaturated fats, all of which may help to lower cholesterol. Soya products – for example soya milk, soya yoghurts, tofu and miso – are of high nutritional value; they contain lots of vitamins, minerals, are high in polyunsaturated fats and low in saturated fat.

Food to Fight high Blood Pressure : Fruit and vegetables contain potassium, which can help manage blood pressure by counteracting the effects of too much salt (sodium). If you have high blood pressure, aim to eat at 7-9 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables each day, focusing on vegetables.

Dietary sources of magnesium, calcium and folic acid such as green leafy vegetables (spinach, kale, pak choy and broccoli), wholegrain cereals, nuts and seeds are essential for blood pressure control.

Food to fight PMS : Eat plenty of low-GI, carbohydrate-rich foods, like oatcakes and wholegrains which keep blood sugar levels stable and provide a sustained source of energy. They can also help with cravings, irritability and mood swings. Research suggests that vitamin B6 – found in cereals, baked potatoes, bananas, chicken, beef and avocado and magnesium – found in spinach, pumpkin seeds, salmon, sesame seeds, white fish may improve a number of PMS symptoms, including those affecting your emotions.

Choose dairy products, leafy green vegetables, soya, celery, cereals, dried fruits and almonds.  Porridge oats and dried fruits are good sources of fibre. Eat less sugar, salt and saturated fat. Cutting back on salt can help to offset the bloating and fluid retention commonly associated with PMS.

Food to fight depression :  Omega-3 fatty acids can help to lift low moods. Increase your intake of oily fish to two or three portions a week, and add some nuts, seeds and avocadoes to your diet. Use olive, rapeseed or walnut oil for cooking and dressing salads. Folate (folic acid), vitamins B6, B12 and magnesium deficiencies have all been linked to depression so get plenty of wholegrains, pulses, dairy products, eggs, nuts, dried apricots and dark chocolate.  Eat regularly, don’t skip meals especially breakfast. Skipping meals sets the scene for fluctuating blood sugar levels

Food to fight Osteoporosis : Magnesium may have an important role to play in helping to keep bones healthy. Good sources include brazil nuts, sunflower and sesame seeds, almonds, bananas and dark green, leafy vegetables such as spinach. Add Kale and Broccoli to your Diet.

Food to fight vision Loss :  Eat less salt and reduce your saturated fat intake. High blood pressure is believed to increase the risk of glaucoma. Cut back on red meat and full fait dairy products. Trim the skin off poultry and remove the fat before cooking meat. Caffeine increases pressure in the eye, and people with glaucoma should avoid caffeine.  

 

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Feeding your body certain foods may help keep your immune system strong. If you’re looking for ways to prevent winter colds and the flu, your first step should be a visit to your local grocery store. Plan your meals to include following powerful immune system boosters.

Citrus Fruits : Most people turn to vitamin C after they’ve caught a cold. That’s because it helps build up your immune system. Vitamin C is thought to increase the production of white blood cells. These are key to fighting infections. Popular citrus fruits include:

  • grapefruit
  • oranges
  • tangerines
  • lemons
  • limes
  • clementines

Because your body doesn’t produce or store it, you need daily vitamin C for continued health. Almost all citrus fruits are high in vitamin C. With such a variety to choose from, it’s easy to add a squeeze of this vitamin to any meal.

Red Ball Peppers : If you think citrus fruits have the most vitamin C of any fruit or vegetable, think again. Ounce for ounce, red bell peppers contain twice as much vitamin C as citrus. They’re also a rich source of beta carotene. Besides boosting your immune system, vitamin C may help maintain healthy skin. Beta carotene helps keep your eyes and skin healthy.

Broccoli : Broccoli is supercharged with vitamins and minerals. Packed with vitamins A, C, and E, as well as many other antioxidants and fiber, broccoli is one of the healthiest vegetables you can put on your table. The key to keeping its power intact is to cook it as little as possible — or better yet, not at all.

Garlic : is found in almost every cuisine in the world. It adds a little zing to food and it’s a must-have for your health. Early civilizations recognized its value in fighting infections. Garlic may also help lower blood pressure and slow down hardening of the arteries. Garlic’s immune-boosting properties seem to come from a heavy concentration of sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin.

Ginger : Ginger is another ingredient many turn to after getting sick. Ginger may help decrease inflammation, which can help reduce a sore throat and other inflammatory illnesses. Ginger may also help decrease nausea.

While it’s used in many sweet desserts, ginger packs some heat in the form of gingerol, a relative of capsaicin. Ginger may help decrease chronic pain and may possess cholesterol-lowering properties, according to recent animal research.

Spinach : is made our list not just because it’s rich in vitamin C. It’s also packed with numerous antioxidants and beta carotene, which may increase the infection-fighting ability of our immune systems. Similar to broccoli, spinach is healthiest when it’s cooked as little as possible so that it retains its nutrients. However, light cooking enhances its vitamin A and allows other nutrients to be released from oxalic acid.

Yogurt : Look for yogurts that have “live and active cultures” printed on the label, like Greek yogurt. These cultures may stimulate your immune system to help fight diseases. Try to get plain yogurts rather than the kinds that are pre-flavored and loaded with sugar. You can sweeten plain yogurt yourself with healthy fruits and a drizzle of honey instead.

Yogurt can also be a great source of vitamin D, so try to select brands fortified with vitamin D. Vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and is thought to boost our body’s natural defences against diseases.

Almonds : When it comes to preventing and fighting off colds, vitamin E tends to take a backseat to vitamin C. However, vitamin E is key to a healthy immune system. It’s a fat-soluble vitamin, meaning it requires the presence of fat to be absorbed properly. Nuts, such as almonds, are packed with the vitamin and also have healthy fats. A half-cup serving, which is about 46 whole, shelled almonds, provides nearly 100 percent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin E

Turmeric : You may know turmeric as a key ingredient in many curries. But this bright yellow, bitter spice has also been used for years as an anti-inflammatory in treating both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Also research shows that high concentrations of curcumin, which gives turmeric its distinctive color, can help decrease exercise-induced muscle damage.

Green Tea : Both green and black teas are packed with flavonoids, a type of antioxidant. Where green tea really excels is in its levels of epigallocatechin gallate, or EGCG, another powerful antioxidant. EGCG has been shown to enhance immune function. The fermentation process black tea goes through destroys a lot of the EGCG. Green tea, on the other hand, is steamed and not fermented, so the EGCG is preserved.

Green tea is also a good source of the amino acid L-theanine. L-theanine may aid in the production of germ-fighting compounds in your T-cells.

Papaya : is another fruit loaded with vitamin C. You can find 224 percent of the daily recommended amount of vitamin C in a single papaya. Papayas also have a digestive enzyme called papain that has anti-inflammatory effects.

Papayas have decent amounts of potassium, B vitamins, and folate, all of which are beneficial to your overall health.

Kiwi : Like papayas, kiwis are naturally full of a ton of essential nutrients, including folate, potassium, vitamin K, and vitamin C. Vitamin C boosts white blood cells to fight infection, while kiwi’s other nutrients keep the rest of your body functioning properly.

Poultry : When you’re sick, chicken soup is more than just a feel-good food with a placebo effect. It helps improve symptoms of a cold and also helps protect you from getting sick in the first place. Poultry, such as chicken and turkey, is high in vitamin B-6. About 3 ounces of light turkey or chicken meat contains 40 to 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of B-6.

Vitamin B-6 is an important player in many of the chemical reactions that happen in the body. It’s also vital to the formation of new and healthy red blood cells. Stock or broth made by boiling chicken bones contains gelatin, chondroitin, and other nutrients helpful for gut healing and immunity.

Sunflower seeds : are full of nutrients, including phosphorus, magnesium, and vitamin B-6. They’re also incredibly high in vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant.

Vitamin E is important in regulating and maintaining immune system function. Other foods with high amounts of vitamin E include avocados and dark leafy greens.

Shellfish : isn’t what jumps to mind for many who are trying to boost their immune system, but some types of shellfish are packed with zinc. Zinc doesn’t get as much attention as many other vitamins and minerals, but our bodies need it so that our immune cells can function as intended.

Varieties of shellfish that are high in zinc include:

  • crab
  • clams
  • lobster
  • mussels

Keep in mind that you don’t want to have more than the daily recommended amount of zinc in your diet. For adult men, it’s 11 milligrams (mg), and for women, it’s 8 mg. Too much zinc can actually inhibit immune system function.

 

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